Slums: Cities of Tomorrow (Bidonville)

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Showings

Roxie Theater Tue, Jun 2, 2015 6:00 PM
Film Info
Director:Jean-Nicolas Orhon
Year of Production:2013
Film Type:Feature
Premiere Status:San Francisco Premiere
Topic:Changing Cities
Country:Canada
Running Time:83 min

Description

English/French/Hindi/Arabic with English subtitles

Our cities are becoming overcrowded. One in six people lives in a slum, a squat, or any other precarious dwelling. In Slums: Cities of Tomorrow, director Jean-Nicolas Orhon gives us an intimate look at the inhabitants and families who, through resilience and ingenuity, have built homes that are well suited to their needs. Often finding inspiration from the architectural traditions of their places of origin. From Mumbai, India, home of the largest slum in all of Asia; to a tent city in Lakewood, New Jersey; via Marseille, France; Kitcisakik, Quebec; and Rabat, Morroco, get a new perspective on these communities.

DISCUSSION WITH: 
- Robert Cortlandt, Producer/Director, 5 Blocks
- Bevan Dufty, Director, Mayor's Office of HOPE (Housing Opportunity, Partnerships & Engagement)
- Zhao Qi, Producer, The Chinese Mayor
- Kristy Wang, Community Planning Policy Director, SPUR.

You might also like to see Changing Cities (May 31) or The Chinese Mayor (May 31).

Included Shorts

Kombit (7min) More

Additional Information

Jean-Nicolas Orhon is a writer/director in both documentary and fiction film. After completing his studies in cinema and anthropology, he directed Asteur (2003), a documentary about the survival of the French language and culture in Louisiana. In 2008, he directed the short fiction film Tu t’souviens tu? The same year, he completed Tant qu’il reste une voix, a documentary about the collecting and recording of oral traditions. In 2011, he directed the short fiction Roule moi un patin, along with some fifteen vignettes exploring the world of wine for the TV program Des kiwis et des hommes. In 2012, he directed Les Nuits de la poésie, a feature length documentary celebrating Quebec poets from 1970 to the present.

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