Song of Lahore
lahore-still_sm.jpg
Showings
Hollywood TheatreWed, Jun 15, 2016 7:30 PM Event Date Passed
 
Series
Series:Sonic Cinema
Promotions
Promos in Effect:Chinook Book (YES)
Guest Pass (YES)
Member Guest Pass (YES)
Film Info
Genre:Documentary
Music
Released:2015
Format:Digital
Cast & Crew
Director:Sharmeen Obaid-Chinoy
Andy Schocken
Soundtrack:Sachal Studios
Description
Wednesday, June 15 at 7:30pm  |  $9  |

Sonic Cinema Presents SONG OF LAHORE, a soul-stirring profile of Pakistani jazz band Sachal Studios as they venture to New York City to perform their sitar-and-tabla reinterpretations of jazz standards with Wynton Marsalis at Lincoln Center.

With its ancient palaces and stately gardens, the Lahore of Pakistan's 1947 independence was a haven and a muse for musicians, artists, and poets. The city came alive to the beat of a tabla drum; with a musical culture passed down over centuries and a thriving film industry, opportunities were great for the legion of musicians that called Lahore home.

Today, this vision of Lahore exists only in myth. Islamization, ethnic divisions, war and corruption have torn apart the cultural fabric of Pakistan, and the sounds of the tabla no longer drift through the old city's bazaar.

In 2004, Izzat Majeed founded Sachal Studios to create a space for traditional music in a nation that had rejected its musical roots. After convincing a number of master musicians to pick up their instruments again, they quietly released some classical and folk albums. But it is an experimental album fusing jazz and South Asian instruments that brings Sachal Studios worldwide acclaim. Their rendition of Dave Brubeck's Take Five becomes a sensation, and Wynton Marsalis invites them to New York to perform with the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. After a groundbreaking week of rehearsals fusing the orchestras from Lahore and New York, the musicians take to the stage for a remarkable concert.

Despite their rising international acclaim, Sachal Studios remains virtually unknown in Pakistan. The ensemble is faced with a daunting task; to reclaim and reinvigorate an art that has lost its space in Pakistan’s narrowing cultural sphere.
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