Thin Ice: The Inside Story of Climate Science
Thin Ice.jpg
Film Type
Film Type:Feature
Topic
Topic:Nature
Description
Simon Lamb and David Sington | New Zealand/UK | 2013 | 73 min

FREE SCREENING

Travel through the Arctic, Antarctic, Southern Ocean, New Zealand, Europe and the USA with geologist Simon Lamb to get this insider's view of the astonishing range of people working to understand the world's changing climate. As climate science has come under increasing attack, the scientists in Thin Ice talk about their work, their hopes and fears with a rare candor and directness. This creates an intimate portrait of the global community of researchers racing to understand our planet's changing climate, and provides a compelling case for rising CO2 as the main cause. This is a unique project: a film about climate science filmed by a scientist and put together by award-winning documentary filmmaker David Sington.

www.thiniceclimate.org

Followed by a discussion with Simon Lamb [via Skype from New Zealand]

You might also like to see The Last Ocean (June 2) or Uranium Drive-In (June 3)



Sponsored by:

Green Planet FilmsGreen Stacks at the San Francisco Public LibrarySan Francisco Public Library
Additional Information
Simon Lamb gained his PhD in Geology at Cambridge University in 1984. He has a major interest in communicating his subject to a wide audience, and has been closely involved in television science documentaries, both as scientific adviser and producer, including the BBC Horizon programme The Man Who Moved the Mountains, and the eight part BBC Earth Story series. He is currently Associate Professor in Geophysics at Victoria University of Wellington.

DOX’s principal film-maker, David Sington has been making films for twenty-five years. He has over 40 producer and series producer credits for prime-time factual programmes on the BBC, Channel 4 and PBS. His most recent work as director is the feature documentary, In the Shadow of the Moon. He is currently acting as Executive Producer on Moon Machines, a six-part series for Discovery Science Channel.
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