Son of Saul

mspfilm_son-of-saul_1.jpg

Showings

Marcus Rochester Cinema Sat, Apr 16, 2016 9:00 PM
Marcus Rochester Cinema Wed, Apr 20, 2016 2:30 PM
Ticket Prices
General Public:$13.00
Members:$10.00
Student (Box Office Only):$7.00
Child (12 & Under):$7.00
Film Info
Original Title:Saul fia
Tags:Drama
Thriller
History
Oscar Winner
Release Year:2015
Runtime:107 min
Festivals & Awards:2016 Academy Award Winner - Best Foreign Language Film
2016 Academy Award Winner - Best Foreign Language Film
Country/Region:Hungary
Language:Hungarian
Yiddish
German
Russian
Polish
French
Greek
Slovak
Print Source:Sony Pictures Classics
Trailer:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NIs1n1zqRk
Cast/Crew
Director:László Nemes
Producer:Gábor Rajna
Gábor Sipos
Cinematographer:Mátyás Erdély
Screenwriter:László Nemes
Clara Royer
Editor:Matthieu Taponier
Composer:László Melis
Principal Cast:Géza Röhrig
Levente Molnár
Urs Rechn
Todd Charmont

Description

MSPIFF Screenings in Rochester will be presented at the Galaxy 14 Cine. To reserve tickets, CLICK HERE.

2016 ACADEMY AWARD WINNER FOR BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM

October 1944, Auschwitz-Birkenau.

Saul Ausländer is a Hungarian member of the Sonderkommando, the group of Jewish prisoners isolated from the camp and forced to assist the Nazis in the machinery of large-scale extermination.

While working in one of the crematoriums, Saul discovers the body of a boy he takes for his son.

As the Sonderkommando plans a rebellion, Saul decides to carry out an impossible task: save the child's body from the flames, find a rabbi to recite the mourner's Kaddish and offer the boy a proper burial.


"A marvel of aesthetic control, speaking almost entirely from images." - Star Tribune


DIRECTOR'S NOTE

Son of Saul is an ambitious film carried out in an economical manner, plunging its viewer directly into the heart of a concentration camp. Our aim was to take an entirely different path from the usual approach of historical dramas, their gigantic scope and multi-point of view narration. This film does not tell the story of the Holocaust, but the simple story of one man caught in a dreadful situation, in a limited framework of space and time. Two days in the life of a man forced to lose his humanity and who finds moral survival in the salvaging of a dead body.

We follow the main character throughout the film, reveal only his immediate surroundings, and create an organic filmic space of reduced proportions closer to human perception. The use of shallow focus photography,the constant presence of off screen elements in the narration of extended takes, the limited visual and factual information the main character and the viewer can have access to -these were the foundations of our visual and narrative strategy. Depicting an accurate world as truthful to history as possible, the events and places of the horror are shown in fragment, leaving room for the imagination of the viewer. Thus, the Inferno we journey through cannot be entirely assessed by the eyes of the viewers, only partially reconstructed in their minds. The multi-language dialogue in this Babel of nations participates in conveying the organic, continuous feeling of human perception caught in the midst of inhumanity.

In such a dark story, I also believe there is a great deal of hope: in a total loss of morality, value and religion, a man who starts listening only to a faint voice within him to carry out a seemingly vain and useless deed finds morality and survival inside.