THE BEATLES' YELLOW SUBMARINE - Sensory Friendly Film

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Showings

Cinema Arts Centre - Cinema 1Sat, Jul 14 11:00 AM Event Date Passed
 

Description

Sensory Friendly Film

THE BEATLES' YELLOW SUBMARINE
Saturday, July 14 at at 11 am | Members $7 | Public $12 |  Children 12 and under $5

The Cinema Arts Centre is proud to offer a special opportunity for those with autism and special needs to enjoy a movie in a safe and accepting environment. We will turn the lights up, and turn the sound down, so all can relax and enjoy quality time without worry. This is also a great opportunity for families to meet, siblings of those with autism to find peers, and for anyone to enjoy a fun film in a climate of understanding.

Our reception area will be open throughout the screening in case anyone needs to step out into a relaxing environment and have a healthy snack.  The reception will also be open after the screening, for food, refreshments, and a chance for folks to meet each other.

Yellow Submarine, based upon a song by John Lennon and Paul McCartney, is a colorful musical spectacle and an exhilaratingly joyful cinematic experience for all ages - filled with visual invention, optical illusions, word play, brimming with peace, love, and hope, propelled by Beatles songs.

When the film debuted in 1968, it was instantly recognized as a landmark achievement, revolutionizing a genre by integrating the freestyle approach of the era with innovative animation techniques. Inspired by the generation’s new trends in art, the film resides with the dazzling Pop Art styles of Andy Warhol, Martin Sharp, Alan Aldridge and Peter Blake. Yellow Submarine is a landmark in animation, with Heinz Edelmann’s inspired art direction conjuring up a non-stop parade of wildly different styles and techniques. From the paper-doll residents of Pepperland, to the tinted photography of the soot covered roofs and smokestacks of Liverpool, the menagerie of fanciful characters in the Sea of Monsters, the kaleidoscopic colour-splashed rotoscoping of Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, the ertigo inducing pop-art of the Sea of Holes, and the triumphant euphony of the It’s All Too Much finale, the film is simply a joy. (UK, 2016, 87 min., NR, English| Dir. George Dunning)